Give a Dragon a Cookie

Give a Dragon a Cookie
by Lester D. Crawford

Jane noticed sitting on the windowsill an arm’s length dragon that shimmered red and green and silver and gold.

“You’re beautiful. Here.” She gave the dragon a cookie.

The dragon chirped, took the cookie, and flew away.

When Sally entered, Jane said, “I saw a colorful dragon.”

“Those are Christmas dragons.”

“New to me. I gave it a cookie.”

“No! It’ll bring others. Quick, run.”

Sally and Jane ran out of the house.

An ever-growing flock of iridescent dragons descended on the house covering it until it collapsed under the mass.

Jane said, “Lesson learned: Don’t feed the Christmas dragons.”

This is my 100-word Christmas story for 2019.

Stories submitted by other writers are here Advent Ghosts 2019: The Stories.

Years ago, I was inspired to attempt writing a 100-word Christmas story by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog. I tend toward long stories, so a 100-word story seemed like something I might not be able to do. I began typing, finished the story, and had exactly 100-words. I was surprised I did it first try. (Read it here. Click 100-word Christmas Stories to see all of them. Some are better than others, but they were all fun to write.) Now, every year, I write a 100-word Christmas story. It’s always fun.

Karma

Karma
by Lester D. Crawford

Santa said, “There are two kinds of people: those who are on the naughty list, and those who are not.” He handed me my gift and added, “Both receive the same gift. Karma sorts things out.”

I love my gift. She’s wonderful. And, karma taught me which list I’m on.

It had been a little sneeze, but now I sit in the yard, in the snow, the cute baby dragon curled up in my lap, asleep, innocent and sweet, smoke still rising from her nostrils as I watch my house burn, the flaming Christmas tree still framed in the window.

My 100-word Christmas story for 2018.

Christmas Rock

Christmas Rock
by Lester D. Crawford

My gift from Santa was a rock, a mesmerizing rock with swirling Christmas colors — silver and gold and red and green. I stared at its iridescence, drawn by desire and need and hope. The rock possessed me. The rock was all that mattered to me. Why had Santa cursed me with the rock?

Then, it hatched.

Out came a shimmering silver and gold and red and green Christmas dragon. Before he hatched he had bonded me to him, made me fall in love with him. Now I will spend the rest of my life serving him.

Thanks a lot, Santa.

This is my 100-word Christmas story for 2017.

Nose

Nose
by Lester D. Crawford

“We’ll never escape that hungry dragon. It’s my nose. Hide Hermey. Hide Yukon. I’ll lead it away.”

He dashed across the snowy meadow away from his friends who hid in a snow bank.

He was a reindeer. He could fly. He could and would out fly the dragon. He leaped into the sky, but a snap of the dragon’s jaws caught him.

The reindeer quickly slid down the dragon’s throat, a red glow in the dragon’s neck showing his progress until it became a wiggling glow shining through the dragon’s belly.

Hermey said, “Let’s hope for good weather this year.”

This story is for the Advent Ghosts 2016 Flash Fiction challenge organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

To see the stories others entered in the challenge, visit Advent Ghosts 2016: The Stories.

Christmas Magic

Christmas Magic
by Lester D. Crawford

Red and green and silver and gold he was, unlike normal dragons who were red or green or silver or gold. He was a Christmas Dragon. Moreover, unlike normal dragons who had only dragon magic, he also had Christmas Magic.

Santa imprisoned the Christmas Dragon in an icy dungeon beneath his North Pole palace. Once a year, he used the dragon’s magic to make reindeer fly.

Then, global climate change melted the dungeon and the dragon escaped Santa’s claws. Without the Christmas Dragon’s magic, Santa could not fly, could not deliver gifts.

That was the end of receiving Christmas presents.

I wrote this story for the Advent Ghosts 2015 Flash Fiction challenge organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

To see the stories others entered in the challenge, visit Advent Ghosts 2015: The Stories.

Be Good for Goodness Sake!

Be Good for Goodness Sake!
by Lester D. Crawford

“Hello. I’m the Christmas Dragon. My name is Thin Air.”

The startled kid said, “What’s a Christmas Dragon?”

“I help Santa.”

“How?”

“You know the list?”

“Of who’s naughty or nice? That’s not real. Santa’s not real. Santa’s never left me a gift.”

“Because you’re always on the naughty list.”

“I’m not naughty.”

“You’re the naughtiest of the naughty. My job is to take care of the naughtiest once and for all.”

“Why haven’t I heard of you?”

“Those who meet the Christmas Dragon disappear.”

With a snap of massive jaws, the naughtiest of the naughty disappeared into Thin Air.

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I wrote this story for the Advent Ghosts 2014 Flash Fiction challenge organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

To see more stories, visit Advent Ghosts 2014: The Stories.

Gifts

Gifts
by Lester D. Crawford

The rotund gentleman dressed in red exited the fireplace.

He screamed.

Before him stood a dragon, its eyes glowing and teeth glistening.

Catching his breath, he said, “1998.”

Turning, he encountered a snarling dragon.

He gasped and said, “2003.”

Sidestepping, he faced another dragon, its gaping jaws reaching for his head.

“1986.”

Dodging dragon after dragon, he finally reached the center of the room.

Under the tree, he placed a gift.

Ready to ascend the chimney, he glanced around the room of dragon sculptures and sighed.

He said, “Every year, he asks for the same thing. This guy is weird.”

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I wrote this story for the Advent Ghosts 2013 Flash Fiction event organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

Advent Ghosts seeks to recreate the classic British tradition of swapping spooky stories at Yuletide. This is the fifth year for the storytelling festival.

To see more stories, visit Advent Ghosts 2013: The Stories.

The Dragon’s Curse

The Dragon’s Curse
by Lester D. Crawford

On Christmas Day, howls arose in the hills, howls of anguish, of loss, of death. The grief contained in those howls washed over the village. In the Great Hall the villagers gathered to escape the pain.

“Sing, everyone sing before our souls are lost to despair!”

They knew from where the wailing came: a heartbroken Dragon. No love is greater than a Dragon’s love for his rider. The most heartrending sound ever heard is the keening of a Dragon whose rider has died.

A Dragon is long lived, meaning he outlives his rider. That long life is the Dragon’s curse.

My Watch Says It’s Christmas


My Watch Says It’s Christmas
by Lester D. Crawford

        Christmas. My watch says it’s Christmas. Why do I still wear this thing? On this world, days are longer making my watch useless. Yet, I still wear it. It’s telling me it’s Christmas. I want Christmas. I want a Christmas tree, a tree like I had growing up, a tree that means happiness and joy, and gifts. I want Christmas. Instead, I’m on this God forsaken alien planet, hiding, hunted by a huge, carnivorous monster, a dragon who stalks me, a dragon who wants me for his Christmas dinner. I must move. I need a better hiding place. Merry Christmas.


Click here to hear MP3 audio file of “My Watch Says It’s Christmas”

This 100-word story is for the “Advent Ghosts 2011” flash-fiction challenge as described on Loren Eaton’s blog I Saw Lightning Fall, in post: “Shared Storytelling: Advent Ghosts 2011,” with links to submitted stories posted here: “Advent Ghosts 2011: The Stories.”