The Key is to Persevere

Step by step, I’m rewriting the most difficult sequence of scenes in the entire current work-in-progress. The task is difficult; yet, with each completed step, I feel great elation.

My struggle is caused by my mind’s rebellion against the perceived complexities of capturing a pivotal character’s shift from sweet and innocent to dark and malevolent while revealing key plot elements and setting up the story’s darkest moment.

The key is to persevere by chipping away at the task until it is done. That’s my short term goal.

2017 Clarion West Write-a-thon Finished

For my 2017 Clarion West Write-a-thon goal, I finished the chapters that let up to the plot point half way through the second half of act two. When I reviewed the outline and reread the previous draft of the last quarter of act two, I was excited, but decided it needed improvements.

In this part of the story, a new character arrives to sow destruction that hits the protagonist at the darkest moment at the end of act two. The character achieves this by moving through a change arc from being sweet and innocent to being wicked and malicious.

Since I worked on the previous draft, I have gained a better understanding of the protagonist’s Lie versus the Truth and how at the midpoint he began trying to change himself. As this new character’s actions challenge him, the wrong path becomes tempting again causing him to struggle to stay on the path he knows is the right one.

I will control the flow in this sequence by using story structure and a character change arc for the new character, in a sense treating it as a standalone story. This will bond the last quarter of the second act in to a coherent theme.

This will be fun.

Character Dimensions, Story Structure, Mind Map, Outline

Character Dimensions, Story Structure, Mind Map, Outline

2017 Clarion West Write-a-thon

I’m using my on-going writing efforts for my participation in this summer’s Clarion West Write-a-thon. My goal is to finish my current work’s second act hitting and passing the story’s darkest moment as I move into the third act.

The write-a-thon is a fundraiser for the Clarion West Writers Workshop, a nonprofit literary organization based in Seattle, Washington, USA, with a mission to improve speculative fiction by providing high quality education to writers at the start of their careers.

You may sponsor me by donating to Clarion West. On the Lester D. Crawford Clarion West Write-a-thon profile page, select the “Sponsor Lester D. Crawford” button.

Tag Lines, Log Lines, and Pitches

After attending a discussion about pitching to agents and publishers, I decided it would be useful to create tag lines, log lines, and pitches for all the stories I have planned for my The Dragon Universe collection. Doing so will help me focus on what those stories are and ensure I create a coherent narrative thread throughout.

For each story, I will write a description for the elements in the narrative structure. I will then add details as they occur to me. As I do this, I will create style sheets to define the characters and locations. My current collection of notes with its hundreds of thousands of words already contains much of this information, and more is still in my head. This project will help me document and organize that information.

While I’m doing this, I will also develop ideas for short stories both within the current story universe and outside it. It would do me good to write a few short stories different from the world in which I’m currently so deeply embedded.

Three-Act Narrative Structure
1. Beginning
2. Inciting Incident
3. Plot Point 1
4. Pinch Point 1
5. Mid Point
6. Pinch Point 2
7. Plot Point 2
8. Climax
9. Ending

Short Story Narrative Structure
1. Action
2. Background
3. Develop
4. Climax
5. Ending

The more I think about how much fun writing is the more I forget how hard it is to write.

Symptoms Instead of Causes

When I began this chapter, I was thinking the midpoint of act two was a big event in a chapter later in the outline. As I worked, I was also studying, again, character change arc concepts. An epiphany struck: the character change arc I had designed for this story focused on symptoms instead of causes.

While the protagonist’s three character dimensions defined in the story design are correct, a reevaluation of the character change arc revealed the correct Lie the protagonist believes and the Truth he needs to accept and pointed to this chapter as being the midpoint of act two.

Now, the 53,000 words that are the first half of this draft of book 5 need to be edited to apply this new understanding. This epiphany also affects the series change arc and the change arcs in each book of the series. Therefore, the 440,000 words in the drafts of the first four books need to also be reworked.

The net effect: better stories, after a lot of editing.

“You are not the boss of me.”

I stared at the Dragon, pondering his unexpected words, and feeling his aggravation through our bond.

“No, I’m not your boss. We’re partners.”

“You do not treat me as a partner. You treat me as if you own me.”

“You’re my Dragon.”

“You are not the boss of me.”

Draft Book 5 Chapter 15 Pages and Word Cloud

Draft Book 5 Chapter 15 Pages and Word Cloud

Inspired by Uni the Unicorn

Somewhere, I don’t remember where, while wandering about in my writing community, someone recommended Uni the Unicorn by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Illustrated by Brigette Barrager. This is a children’s book for ages 3 – 7 years. My local library system has five copies all of which are currently checked out.

Following is the publisher’s description of the story.

“Uni the unicorn is told there’s no such thing as little girls! But no matter what the grown-up unicorns say, Uni believes that little girls are REAL. Somewhere there must be a smart, strong, wonderful, magical little girl waiting to be best friends. In fact, far away (but not too far away), a real little girl believes there is a unicorn waiting for her, too. This magical story of friendship reminds believers and nonbelievers alike that sometimes wishes really can come true.”

The story is lovely, but ends shockingly.

SPOILER ALERT! Uni and the little girl do not meet.

My reaction was, “What the heck!” The ending was not what I expected.

Scheduled for release on September 5, 2017, is Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Illustrated by Brigette Barrager. I hope Uni and the little girl meet this time.

I requested my local library system add the book to their collection. Recently, when I checked the status of my request, I found that, on by behest, they had ordered five copies.

Rosenthal inspired within me the desire to write my own children’s book influenced by the story-world in my current work-in-progress. My mind minions are already providing me ideas for the story and the lesson it will teach.

On March 13, 2017, Amy Krouse Rosenthal passed away. Rosenthal wrote more than 30 books. I, for one, had been touched by her writing. She will be missed.

Uni the Unicorn and Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True Book Covers

Uni the Unicorn and Uni the Unicorn and the Dream Come True Book Covers

Planning and Plotting Better

As I near the midpoint of book five, I’m evaluating what I’ve learned about the craft of writing and about my story. I had written the majority of what is now book three before I decided the story had five phases that could each stand alone. Also, by splitting the story, I could keep the word count reasonable for each book instead of having a book the size only certain authors can get away with. One result of this decision was the need to rework each book to make their structures standalone.

Years of study and practice has increased my understanding and skill with story structure and character change arcs. Redesigning my story using that knowledge will improve the story, but the skill is not necessarily reflexive. To some extent, my innate story telling ability has served me, but to do better, I must think instead of relying on instincts.

I created a chart to help me visualize my goal of creating well structured standalone books yet have them progress in an overall series structure and to prompt me to envision how character change arcs apply to the books and the series. The chart isn’t spectacular, but I find it useful to stare at as my mind explores possibilities.

This is only a beginning, though. The next step is to document what my explorations reveal and plan how to pace the plot and change arcs across the terrain of each book and the series. How I handle the next step may become a blog post in the future.

Five Book Story Structure - Chart for visualizing story structure across a five book series.

Chart for visualizing story structure across a five book series.

Enhancing my Skills by Reading the Best

C. J. Cherryh is a fascinating author. A while back, I read The Morgaine Stories (Gate of Ivrel, Well of Shiuan, Fires of Azeroth, and Exile’s Gate). Her use of tight third-person point-of-view impressed me. For me it was the tightest third-person I had ever read and felt as if it were first-person using third-person pronouns. Her skills at world building and creating characters also impressed me. Reading those stories, I learned techniques that helped me improve my writing.

Cherryh’s Cyteen also struck me as incredible in its world building and characters. The story left me thinking about nature versus nurture and what makes each of us what we are. I am still working on how to apply those insights to my own stories. I need to read Regenesis, the next book in the series.

Currently, I’m finishing up The Nighthorse Series a.k.a. The Finisterre Series, or The Rider Series (Rider at the Gate and Cloud’s Rider). Again I’m impressed, even awed. I see these stories as having a tight third-person voice, yet at moments, information is exposed in a tone that verges on omniscient. Those moments are so well integrated they flow flawlessly without knocking me out of the tight third-person perspective. Cherryh’s use of language and her sentence structures also impresses me.

While my voice is nothing like Cherryh’s, and I will never be able to write like her, or want to write like her since her style does not suit my voice, I am improving my craft skills by reading her work. More C. J. Cherryh books that will enhance my skills sit ready to read in my To Read pile.

C. J. Cherryh The Morgaine Stories, Cyteen, and The Nighthorse Series Covers

Nose

Nose
by Lester D. Crawford

“We’ll never escape that hungry dragon. It’s my nose. Hide Hermey. Hide Yukon. I’ll lead it away.”

He dashed across the snowy meadow away from his friends who hid in a snow bank.

He was a reindeer. He could fly. He could and would out fly the dragon. He leaped into the sky, but a snap of the dragon’s jaws caught him.

The reindeer quickly slid down the dragon’s throat, a red glow in the dragon’s neck showing his progress until it became a wiggling glow shining through the dragon’s belly.

Hermey said, “Let’s hope for good weather this year.”

This story is for the Advent Ghosts 2016 Flash Fiction challenge organized by Loren Eaton of the I Saw Lightning Fall blog.

Every story in Advent Ghosts must be exactly 100 words in length.

To see the stories others entered in the challenge, visit Advent Ghosts 2016: The Stories.

Inspired To Be the Best Me I Can Be

A while back, I read several short stories by Ted Chiang. The stories overwhelmed me with their magnitude, complexity, and depth of concepts making me feel inadequate as a writer. Surprisingly, that did not undermine my desire to be a writer. Chiang’s stories are the product of genius, and hard work. I may not have the genius, but I can work hard. I like what I write. I will never be a Chiang, but I am inspired to be the best me I can be.

The movie Arrival (2016) is based on Chiang’s story Story of Your Life, which was one of the stories that had wowed me. The movie, even with the changes made to turn it into a movie, was as intellectually thrilling as the short story.

I suggest seeing Arrival and if you want to read Chiang’s first eight short stories, check out Stories of Your Life and Others. You too will be inspired to be the best you you can be.

Stories of Your Life and Others book cover

Stories of Your Life and Others book cover

Arrival movie poster

Arrival movie poster